Did You Know One of the Most Popular X-Men Is a Devout Catholic?

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In October of 1992, the famed X-Men: The Animated Series, made its debut appearance. For the first time on television, the animated series brought to life the characters from the classic X-Men comic books. One episode animates to life the popular mutant superhero Nightcrawler, who many don’t know is a devout Catholic.

In the 44th episode of the animated series, entitled “Nightcrawler,” the X-Men Gambit, Rogue, and the Wolverine take a ski trip to Germany. While Gambit and Rogue are enjoying their time together and relaxing, the Wolverine is restless and longs for some action. He hears rumors that a demon is hiding within a local monastery in town; however, when he investigates he finds not a demon, but a fellow mutant who despite his devilish appearance is a philosophical and pious Catholic.

Kurt Wagner, known as Nightcrawler, is a deeply religious man who even studied for the priesthood despite never being ordained. In the episode, he is a monk living inside a monastery, because the townspeople fear his appearance and have mistaken him for a demon. An ensuing argument between the X-Men and Nightcrawler spark the townspeople to attack them, and in the crossfire the monastery burns down. However, the X-Men convince the townspeople not to fear what they don’t understand, and the episode ends with the famous Wolverine praying in a French cathedral, having found his faith again.

“No, my friend, God does not give up on his children – human or mutant. He is there for us in our times of joy and to help us when we are in pain – if we let Him. Our ability to understand God’s purposes is limited, but take comfort in the fact that His love is limitless.” – Kurt Wagner, Nightcrawler

Watch the scenes from the original episode:

 

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11 COMMENTS

  1. If you look at the 1602 version of the X-Men, they’re very Catholic with Carlos Javier as the leader of the band of Catholic X-Men. I also love their school motto: ““Omnia mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis,” or ““All things change, and we change with them.”

  2. Thank you for your article. As a dad of two (1 boy, 1 girl), I find it difficult to share the importance of faith to them, since so many things this world often paint faith as an outdated concept. Thank you for reminding my that sometimes we can find nuggets of faith even in a cartoon. Thank you for helping me find something to help teach my kids.

  3. Hello. I actually did know this. This may be one of the reasons that Kurt is tied for my number one favorite mutant. I also Catholic. (P.s. my other favorite that Kurt is tied with is Angel.)

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