Saint Scholastica

Saint Scholastica (480-543), sister of Saint Benedict, consecrated her life to God from her earliest youth. After her brother went to Monte Cassino, where he established his famous monastery, she took up her abode in the neighborhood at Plombariola, where she founded and governed a monastery of nuns, about five miles from that of St. Benedict, who, it appears, also directed his sister and her nuns.

Saint Maroun

Saint Maroun was a 5th century Syriac Christian monk who after his death was followed by a religious movement that became known as the Maronites. He was a priest that later became a hermit. His holiness and miracles attracted many followers and drew attention throughout the empire.

Saint Josephine Bakhita

Saint Josephine Bakhita was born to a wealthy family in Sudan but was kidnapped by slave traders at the age of 9. she was eventually bought by an Italian consul who eventually entrusted her to the Canossian Sisters of the Institute of the Catechumens in Venice.

Saint Luke the Younger

Hermit and wonder-worker whose solitary hermitage in Thessaly, Greece, became known as the Soterion, “the place of healing.”

Saint Paul Miki and Companions

Brother Paul Miki, a Jesuit and a native of Japan, has become the best known among the martyrs of Japan. He was crucified on Februay 5 with twenty-five other Catholics during the persecution of Christians under the Taiko, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, ruler of Japan in the name of the emperor. In total, 26 martyrs of Japan were crucified on the hill, now known as the Holy Mountain, overlooking Nagasaki.

Saint Agatha

Saint Agatha lived in Sicily in the 6th century. When she was young, she dedicated her life to God and resisted any men who wanted to marry her or have sex with her. One spurned suitor had her forced into a brothel, imprisoned and martyred.

Saint Joan of Valois

Saint Joan of Valois, 1464 - 1505, was the second daughter of Louis XI, King of France, and Charlotte of Savoy. St. Joan was by no means a prepossessing figure: she was hunch-backed, lame and pock-marked. On her husband's succession to the throne he obtained a declaration that the marriage was invalid. Joan, therefore, was not to be queen of France; she was given instead the title of Duchess of Berry. “If so it is to be, praised be the Lord”, was her remark on this occasion.

Saint Blaise

Saint Blaise's feast day because of the Blessing of the Throats that took place on this day. Two candles are blessed, held slightly open, and pressed against the throat as the blessing is said. Saint Blaise's protection of those with throat troubles apparently comes from a legend that a boy was brought to him who had a fishbone stuck in his throat. The boy was about to die when Saint Blaise healed him.

Feast of the Presentation of the Lord

In accordance with Mosaic law, forty days after the birth of Christ, Mary redeemed her first-born from the temple, and was purified by the prayer of Simeon the just, in the presence of Anna the prophetess.

Saint Brigid of Ireland

Saint Brigid of Ireland (452 - 525) was probably born at Faughart near Dundalk, Louth, Ireland. Her parents were baptized by St. Patrick, with whom she developed a close friendship. She was was Abbess of the first convent in Ireland and is co-patroness of that land.

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