Man Who Attempted To Assassinate Pope John Paul Wants To Become A Priest

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In an interview with an Italian TV show, Mehmet Alì Ağca, the Turkish man who attempted to assassinate Pope John Paul II, said he wants to become a Catholic Priest.

“Here in Turkey, I live as a pensioner, who wasting my time. So I want to make an appeal to Pope Francis: welcome me into the Vatican and I will become a priest.” Ağca said.

He continued saying “After John Paul II visited me in prison, I thought about it, and I studied the Gospel at length. I know the sacred books better than many others. If the pope welcomes me, I’ll be a priest and I will celebrate Mass, if he wants me!”

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Pope John Paul II visiting Agca in his prison cell in 1983

He also said he wished to travel with Pope Francis in 2017 to Fatima. “I would go to Fatima next year, in May 2017, for the centenary of the Marian apparitions. And there praying, perhaps together with the Pope, Our Lady, my spiritual mother.”

Mehmet Alì Ağca shot and almost killed Pope Saint John Paul II in an assassination attempt on May 13, 1981, the Feast of Our Lady of Fatima. Pope John Paul often credited his survival to the protection of Our Lady of Fatima.

The 58-year-old Mehmet Alì Ağca, however, has a history of making bizarre statements, including claiming to be Christ and writing to Pope John Paul II claiming the world would soon end.

Comments

9 COMMENTS

  1. This story reminded me of “The Island”. During World War II, the sailor Anatoly and his captain, Tikhon, are captured by the Nazis when they board their barge and tugboat which is carrying a shipment of coal. The Nazi officer leading the raid offers Anatoly the choice to shoot Tikhon and stay alive which Anatoly reluctantly takes, and Tikhon falls overboard. The Nazis blow up the ship but Anatoly is found by Russian Orthodox monks on the shore the next morning. He survives and becomes a stoker at the monastery but is perpetually overcome with guilt. Thirty years pass. Anatoly now has the gifts of prophecy and healing. But the other monks do not really understand him. People come to see Anatoly for cures and guidance, but even now, he remains in a perpetual state of repentance. He often gets in a boat and goes to an uninhabited island where he prays for mercy and forgiveness. A prominent admiral and his daughter arrive to see Anatoly. The daughter is possessed by a demon but Anatoly exorcises it. The admiral turns out to be Tikhon. It is revealed that Anatoly only wounded him during the war. Tikhon forgives Anatoly. Anatoly announces his death by Wednesday; the monks provide a coffin. Dressed in a white garment such as Jesus wore, he lies in the coffin, wearing a crucifix. Monks, one carrying a large cross representing the risen Christ, are seen rowing the coffin away from the island.
    The film is focused on father Anatoly’s repentance of his sin (therefore the virtually continuous occurrence of the Jesus Prayer); but the transgressions of the depicted character (a fool for Christ) and their impact on the others are the means by which the actual plot develops. The film’s director Pavel Lungin, speaking of the central character’s self-awareness, said he doesn’t regard him as being clever or spiritual, but blessed “in the sense that he is an exposed nerve, which connects to the pains of this world. His absolute power is a reaction to the pain of those people who come to it;” while “typically, when the miracle happens, the lay people asking for a miracle are always dissatisfied” because “the world does not tolerate domestic miracles.”
    Screenwriter Dmitry Sobolev further explains: “When a person ask for something from God, he is often wrong because God has a better understanding of what a person needs at that moment.”[1] Pyotr Mamonov, who plays the lead character, formerly one of the few rock musicians in the USSR, converted to Eastern Orthodoxy in the 1990s and lives now in an isolated village. Pavel Lungin said about him that “to a large extent, he played himself.” Mamonov received a blessing from his confessor for playing the character.
    The simplicity, the humbleness, the remoteness, the miracles converge into creating a timeless snapshot of Orthodox spirituality, apart from the historical circumstances. The Patriarch of Moscow, Alexei II, praised Ostrov for its profound depiction of faith and monastic life, calling it a “vivid example of an effort to take a Christian approach to culture.”

  2. But don’t forget, John Paul II did forgive him.
    The murder of St Marie Gortti also was pardoned and he became a monk.

    • I don’t know this man, but given his history the Catholic Church has to be careful both for his sake and others’. Forgiveness and help are absolutely to be given to him, but the priesthood has to be seriously discerned on his part and the part of the Church. But who am I to say? 🙂 I hope the best for him as Pope John Paul II did!

  3. If I am not mistaken he also once said that he is Jesus, I think that he is not mentaly stable, so one cannot give weight to his always fascinating statements !

  4. I think it’s to late to be a priest. Becoming a monk is more suitable for him lest he’s not planning to torch or bomb the Vatican.

  5. I agree with you Val. Priesthood may be a bit late for him but holiness being a lifetime “career” is never too late. Priesthood is not the only and even the best way to serve God if that is his goal. We as Christians should forgive and I believe if he was forgiven by the person whom he injured, who are we to not forgive…as such was the example demonstrated by our Lord and Redeemer, Jesus Christ. However, we must be cautious too, consider his fascinating statements…thus if he really wish for holiness and at the same time prove his sincerity, his faith, he could just remain as he is and serve God as a lay person.

  6. I agree with you Val. Priesthood may be a bit late for him but holiness being a lifetime “career” is never too late. Priesthood is not the only and even the best way to serve God if that is his goal. We as Christians should forgive and I believe if he was forgiven by the person whom he injured, who are we to not forgive…as such was the example demonstrated by our Lord and Redeemer, Jesus Christ

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