Catechism of The Catholic Church #1907

1907 First, the common good presupposes respect for the person as such. In the name of the common good, public authorities are bound to respect the fundamental and inalienable rights of the human person. Society should permit each of its members ...

Catechism of The Catholic Church #2548

2548 Desire for true happiness frees man from his immoderate attachment to the goods of this world so that he can find his fulfillment in the vision and beatitude of God. “The promise [of seeing God] surpasses all beatitude…. In ...

Catechism of The Catholic Church #1761

1761 There are concrete acts that it is always wrong to choose, because their choice entails a disorder of the will, i.e., a moral evil. One may not do evil so that good may result from it. . .

Catechism of The Catholic Church #1717

1717 The Beatitudes depict the countenance of Jesus Christ and portray his charity. They express the vocation of the faithful associated with the glory of his Passion and Resurrection; they shed light on the actions and attitudes characteristic ...

Catechism of The Catholic Church #2342

2342 Self-mastery is a long and exacting work. One can never consider it acquired once and for all. It presupposes renewed effort at all stages of life. The effort required can be more intense in certain periods, such as when the personality is ...

Catechism of The Catholic Church #2517

2517 The heart is the seat of moral personality: “Out of the heart come evil thoughts, murder, adultery, fornication….” The struggle against carnal covetousness entails purifying the heart and practicing temperance:¬†Remain ...

Catechism of The Catholic Church #1302

1302 It is evident from its celebration that the effect of the sacrament of Confirmation is the full outpouring of the Holy Spirit as once granted to the apostles on the day of Pentecost . .

Catechism of The Catholic Church #1734

1734 Freedom makes man responsible for his acts to the extent that they are voluntary. Progress in virtue, knowledge of the good, and ascesis enhance the mastery of the will over its acts. . .