Pope Francis Said Doing This Is Like Stealing From The Poor… And YOU Probably Do It Everyday.

12
118843

During his pontificate, Pope Francis has ardently pleaded with the world to address the dire situation around the world’s food supply. Keeping in line with his simple and pragmatic nature, he proposes that everyone make one simple change that can make a major impact: reducing food waste.

“Throwing away food is like stealing from the table of the poor and the hungry,” he said.

Roughly one-third of the food produced in the world for human consumption every year — approximately 1.3 billion tons — is wasted. That is enough to feed all those who struggle or die from hunger.  In the United States alone, 40% of all food is thrown away and never eaten.

“This culture of waste has made us insensitive even to the waste and disposal of food, which is even more despicable when all over the world, unfortunately, many individuals and families are suffering from hunger and malnutrition,” the Pope said.

“Once our grandparents were very careful not to throw away any leftover food. Consumerism has led us to become used to an excess and daily waste of food, to which, at times we are no longer able to give a just value.”

In an unprecedented move, Pope Francis personally spoke today at the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, where he marked World Food Day by calling for governments to work together to address the problem of hunger. Drawing a standing ovation, he said that population control is not the answer, but instead, a change in lifestyle and the use of resources.

“We cannot make do by saying ‘someone else will do it,” said Pope Francis

Right now, almost 900,000,000 people struggle with hunger every day. Every single second, a person dies from hunger. This is a tragedy of mind-numbing proportions. While many in the west throw food away without a second thought, people are literally dying. But, as Pope Francis said, you cannot expect someone else to address the issue.

To help the poor and hungry get access to life-saving nutrition, The Pontifical Mission Societies have created MISSIO, a new and innovative Catholic crowd-funding platform that allows you to directly assist Catholic missions and projects all over the world.

MISSIO allows you to search through life-giving and life-saving projects – ones providing for basic needs, others extending the Good News of the Gospel to remote areas, and still more, bringing the light of the Lord’s loving-kindness to those in the darkest circumstances. With MISSIO, you can choose one of these missions of Pope Francis and donate directly to them, knowing that 100% of your donation will go directly there. You can also share them on social media and reignite the discussion and remind people of these forgotten situations, so others can support the projects also.

Launched by Pope Francis himself, the MISSIO platform offers a direct connection to change-makers who work on the “front lines” making a difference for the poor and forgotten through direct, daily service.

There are opportunities to help the Daughters of Mary fight malnutrition in Tanzaniastart a pig farm in Cameroon, or help Catholic priests and Sisters bring food to those affected by famine and war in South Sudan.

MISSIO is powered by The Pontifical Mission Societies, the Catholic Church’s official support organization for overseas missions since 1822, providing for a global network of people who are making a difference for communities in need around the globe.

Remember the words of Isaiah 58:10:

If you offer your food to the hungry
and satisfy the needs of the afflicted,
then your light shall rise in the darkness
and your gloom be like the noonday.

Check out MISSIO today and start giving!

Comments

12 COMMENTS

  1. I’m sorry, the problem is not a lack of food. There is plenty of food. There is so much food we are growing corn for fuel instead of food now. The problem is areas of the world where food is not allowed to get to hungry people. This is a big problem in Africa, in areas controlled by warlords who are engaged in religious or ethnic cleansing. You can’t get your half-eaten sandwich to a hungry person in time before it begins to go bad, and unless the person were starving they wouldn’t want it.

    • Seems to me the Pope needs bombers.

      Seed bombers.

      There is an obvious way to solve both global warming and the hunger problem at the same time: Increase the biomass of native edible plants.

      We should be loading up bombers with the seeds of native edibles and dropping them from 30,000 feet. Let the warlords try to control the food supply when every drainage ditch, every roof, every parking lot, every desert is turning green growing food. Let’s see how long atmospheric carbon can hold out at its present level when there is three times the biomass absorbing it than there is now.

      Care for our common home= return to Eden.

  2. I have heard this my whole childhood. It didn’t make sense then and it doesn’t make sense now. I used to watch the kids grow the food into the trash after school lunch and think about it. If it’s not in the trash, where is it? In the stomach? Maybe in the pantry? Maybe still on store shelves? It’s so unrelated. Say we take only exactly what we eat and it stays stocked in the store. How does that help hungry kids eat? The store doesn’t donate the drop in sales to kids in China. Stores will stock less. Farms will produce less or sell to more businesses. Or add new crops. None of this, not one of these factors, effect the hungry children. It’s not related. How about, “Be grateful you can eat. When you grow up fight for wealth equality. Learn how poor people are oppressed, and try to help remove barriers to success.” LOL.

    • Our society is wasteful. As individuals, with awareness, we can decide not to waste food and other resources. Then we would have more money because we would spend less on wasted food and would be able to donate to programs to help feed starving people or maybe even have time and money to afford a mission trip to witness how we can share with others. Why spend money on good food to simply throw it in the trash? It defies logic, but as a teacher I see it daily… I tell kids “don’t throw it out; take it home so your parents know you aren’t eating it and they might stop spending their hard-earned money on it.” I don’t see the disconnect at all…it’s definitely related. Overconsumption is a symptom of our consumer/materialistic society. Most of us could live with less and think of others more.

  3. Carolyn, maybe it will help to rephrase what Pope Francis has said. “We know how much we only need. Let’s only procure what we need and donate what we save to help the poor.”

  4. people can eat less and give the difference to a charity that provides food for the hungry. How many Americans can easily do without a hamburger a month and send that money somewhere? It’s too little to affect American companies yet a huge difference for those who are hungry.

LEAVE A REPLY